Sound Press Release

October 30, 2014 in featured, Fiona Robertson by mwhiteside

new sound logoShockwaves as arts body pulls regular funding from Scotland’s acclaimed new music festival

Shockwaves were felt widely today as the national arts body, Creative Scotland, pulled regular funding from sound, Scotland’s acclaimed new music Festival. Currently celebrating its 10th anniversary, sound is recognised internationally as a leading festival of new music and locally for its vibrant programme of concerts and community projects across the north east. The festival, whose patrons include world famous percussionist Evelyn Glennie and leading composer James Macmillan is the main hub for new music in Scotland. This year it began a major collaboration with sister festival in France, Musiques Demesurées, and was last year shortlisted for a prestigious Royal Philharmonic Society Award. sound was also described recently by one of the world’s leading percussionists, Colin Currie, as hugely important internationally and vital to performers like himself for whom new commissions are central to their repertoire.

Over the years sound has commissioned more than 40 new works including the critically acclaimed Framed Against the Sky with Brian Irvine and poet Billy Letford which involved hundreds of people across the north east in its creation, and Three Fables with Stephen Montague and Zinnie Harris, one of the highlights of the 2014 Commonwealth Games arts programme and New Music Biennial. It has also premiered hundreds of pieces.

Whilst Creative Scotland commended sound on its excellence and experimentation, and the access that is offers for audiences, they told the festival organisers that they had decided not to include it in the body’s portfolio of Regular Funded organisations.

Festival director, Fiona Robertson said:

“We are obviously distraught that we have lost our regular Creative Scotland funding. It is particularly distressing finding out in the middle of a hugely successful festival which has seen performers from across the world coming to Aberdeen, and world premieres of pieces we have commissioned specially from composers living and working in Scotland and beyond.”

“Planning for the 2015 Festival was well advanced and we will now have take time to establish which of the many and exciting projects that we were developing it will be possible to go ahead with. ”

“We have been advised that the only money available to sound going forward is the open project funding which will impact significantly on our ability to commission new work and achieve our ambitions for new music in Scotland. However, we will continue to work tirelessly to ensure that that Scotland has a vital platform for showcasing new music.”

Associate Ensemble of sound, Red Note, expressed its shock that the festival with which it has worked closely for five years. Director John Harris said:

“As Associate Ensemble, we have been recipients of incredible levels of support from sound ever since Red Note’s formation 5 years ago. We have collaborated closely with sound on many hugely successful projects, developing new audiences across rural Aberdeenshire and bringing new music to people who may never have experienced it before.

The success of this work is due to sound’s superb skill and creativity in making wonderful things happen, and their reputation as a beacon of new and original thinking is recognised across Scotland, the UK and beyond.

We are not alone in being dismayed that Creative Scotland have chosen not to support sound’s growth and development through Regular Funding, and we hope that sound’s achievement and potential will be recognised, supported and developed to its full, remarkable potential by Creative Scotland.

sound is a hugely innovative and important part of the Scotland contemporary cultural landscape, and we most definitely want to see it continue to grow and develop for many years to come.”

The 10th anniversary sound programme continues this coming Friday with a double bill of traditional music with a twist at Woodend Barn in Banchory. The concerts showcase Turkish Harp music and Scottish/Scandinavian fiddle music. In Aberdeen Ensemble Thing will give a free lunchtime concert on Saturday in the Art Gallery and on Saturday evening the celebrated Mr McFall’s Chamber perform at the Lemon Tree. Their programme, Remembered/Imagined, showcases the results of collaborations between Scottish traditional musicians and composers and writers. Performers will include Gaelic singer Maeve Mackinnon, author and actor Angus Peter Campbell and electronic artist and Creative Producer Amble Skuse. The new works are interwoven with beautiful traditional repertoire and poetry, creating a performance that captures the riches of Scotland’s cultural history through music and words with live instrumental, vocal and electronic sound. Meanwhile on Saturday and Sunday afternoons drumming workshops for young people with Kuljit Bhamra and family concerts with Red Note Ensemble Kuljit Bhamra and Fraser Fifield by will be on offer in Migvie Church and Salmon Bothy Portsoy, and over the weekend there will be late night sound sessions in Musa.

Full details of this weekend’s programme at www.sound-scotland.co.uk

Time Out Residency

October 20, 2014 in featured, guest blog, Jo Buckley by Jo Buckley

Francis MacDonald, Sonia Allori, Colin Broom, Drew Hammond, John De Simone and Oliver Searle

Francis MacDonald, Sonia Allori, Colin Broom, Drew Hammond, John De Simone and Oliver Searle

Earlier this year we put out a call for composers: rather than a call for scores, we were looking for composers seeking ‘time out’. Composers who were keen to take a break from the day-to-day challenges of composing, to get together with other like-minded folk and to share, explore and discuss what it means to be a composer in today’s modern world. As one of the participants at the residency announced on arrival: ‘I just want the chance to have a total geek-out and talk about composing all weekend’.

And this is just what we did. We gathered together six composers in the beautiful surroundings of Cove Park, near Helensburgh on Scotland’s west coast. Situated on a hill overlooking Loch Long, where the mist lingers in the morning and gradually lifts by the afternoon to reveal the real beauty of the loch beneath, Cove Park is a haven for artists of all kinds. As well as offering great communal spaces for group work and social sessions, the centre also has self-contained accommodation ‘pods’ and ‘cubes’ for individuals to hide themselves away from the world and get stuck into their personal projects. Left to our own devices over the course of the weekend, we were able to roam the rural, wooded site, gather in separate places for one-on-one sessions and come together in the lovely studio space for dinner, listening, talking and sharing.

The aim of the residency was not to teach anyone anything, but to allow the composers to learn from one another, and to share their ideas and concerns about their work in a supportive environment. Along with Fiona Robertson, I helped shepherd the group sessions and together we structured the discussions around issues that were high on their agendas, which included: How do you promote yourself and find new commissions? How do you create? How do you use technology in your work? When do you find time to compose? The composers were also paired off for one-on-one sessions, where they had the opportunity to swap skills with one another, offer support and learn from one another’s particular expertise. We were also delighted to welcome Sally Beamish for the Saturday morning, when she spoke openly about her own path towards life as a professional composer, the challenges she met on the way, and the techniques and tools she developed to overcome them. Inspiring and intriguing in equal measure, Sally’s session provided a platform from which much of the weekend’s discussions emanated.

There was no shortage of talking in this weekend ‘geek-out’ and by Sunday afternoon we had covered everything from how to orchestrate music for strings to the challenges of composing within the constraints of family life. But everyone – and I include myself and Fiona in this – left the residency inspired, rejuvenated and ready to tackle our work with a renewed sense of purpose and determination.

Here is what the six composers had to say about their own personal experiences at Time Out.

Francis MacDonald

If I wasn’t careful I was in danger of morphing into a character from Little Britain, prefacing almost every comment with “I didn’t study classical music, you know” (“I’m the only only gay in the village!”). This is a reflection of my own circumstances and my wrangling with the idea of Who Or What Defines A Composer. It was reassuring to know that is a fluid concern for both part-time and professional classically-trained composers:

“Sometimes you feel like a fraud? Me too!”

“But you’re not.”

“Neither are you.”

“Let’s bond.”

I only knew the lovely Sonia Allori (from the EIFF Composer’s Lab 2013 but I found everyone else in the group – John, Oliver, Drew and Colin (and Jo and Fiona and Donald) and Sally Beamish – to be welcoming and generous in sharing their knowledge and wisdom. Writing music can be a solitary concern. Bringing people together to discuss and share, in a conducive environment can only be a good thing. This residency was planned and organised extremely well. I am still processing everything that I have managed to soak up. But first thing’s first: I’m off to buy a Pomodoro Kitchen Timer.

Sonia Allori

The New Music Scotland “Timeout Composer Residency” has given me a unique opportunity. Composing as a creative practice can be an isolated endeavour and yet during the last few days I have found myself amongst a group of exceptionally gracious and incredibly supportive kindred souls, with whom sharing process, thoughts and music was a truly organic and intrinsic outcome. This should happen every year as a means to connect, to laugh and to normalise “being a composer”!

Drew Hammond

I tend to believe that a set of ideas arrived on through open and honest discourse will be far more robust than the individually held predilections and biases that constitute personal dogma. One may understand this, it may even be kind of obvious, but it is nevertheless gratifying to engage with such a discourse about creative practice in a setting set aside specifically for that purpose. For me it has had the effect of eroding some of my own hidden, vague, but nonetheless poisonous notions of artistic practice in Scotland, primarily the vision of practitioners as competitors only, each of us sorting out how to maximise our own slice of the ever-diminishing pie of public funding. One short weekend of chatting about, thinking about, and in essence living in the kind of environment we normally may only hope for brings me face to face with the blinding truth: if we choose to see ourselves exclusively on their terms, the terms of the neo-liberal capitalist priesthood – that old Social Darwinist chestnut – we will be choosing our own ultimate extinction.   We may at times bemoan the dire financial straits that The Arts is now apparently in, but we mustn’t forget that societal patronage is a two-way street where our vibrancy and our creativity will deeply impact the future of the arts in Scotland, and leave aside any tendency toward despondency and inaction. A true forwarding of the arts will not be achieved on those therms, in the dumbed down notions of market economics and football relegation that make up so much of the way we are constantly told to think about the world. No, what we need is much better encapsulated in the language of “scene” and “community.” And our scene must be one that chooses a deeper meaning for human activity; we are after all either fools, or not actually here for the money.

Colin Broom

I applied to for a place on New Music Scotland’s Time Out residency for a couple of reasons: I was interested (as I always am) in discussing composing, methods and practice and careers with other composers. Secondly, I was interesting in hearing other composers’ experience (and indeed the experience of the facilitators, Fiona and Jo) of self-promotion, which, for all the reasonable confidence I have in my own practice as an artist, is an area I feel I could be better on. Finally, I was interested to have some discussion about a piece I’m currently working on, and get some objective thoughts on what I’m doing from other composers of similar levels (if different areas) of experience and an open, comfortable environment.

I found the residency was hugely worthwhile. Despite the variance in backgrounds of many of us, several common themes emerged across the weekend, one strong one was that of self-promotion, creating and pursuing opportunities. Everyone shared their own experience of this, and it’s always reassuring to hear others voice similar discomforts about “putting themselves out there” but also to offer some thoughts on ways in which they have handled this. IT was also useful to hear Fiona and Jo’s (of NMS) take on this from the promoter, festival/record label running perspective.

It was also good to hear Sally Beamish’s thoughts on this from her perspective as a more experienced professional composer. Sally was open and very generous in her discussion of her own career, and it was interesting and good to hear the route she has taken, as well as her own working practice.

It was also good to discuss many of the more composition-specific aspects of our practice, from the minutiae of day-to-day practice (starting work, the usefulness of procrastination) to the much larger and wide ranging themes such has how we perceive our work in the larger musical or artistic context.

Across the weekend there was a real openness and generosity of sharing practice and sharing music, and this for me was what made it an insightful, constructive atmosphere and a consistently engaging dynamic. It was hugely helpful to have a group of composers of similar age and experience round the table and in this respect the “peer to peer” aspect of the residency was for me very useful. The fact that it took place in the beautiful misty surroundings of Cove Park, with excellent facilities certainly helped as well.

I’m grateful to have been selected by NMS to attend the residency, which I feel I got a lot of information and ideas from, all of which I will continue to think about, and plan informed by what I have heard and considered over the weekend.

Some of the other composer I knew before the residency, but I expect I will keep in touch with all of the composers, and with NMS.

All of this, in combination with future NMS residencies with other participants (which I hope happen), and related events, should I hope contribute to the consolidation of a sense of a community of composers working in Scotland but worthy of notice much further afield. A hugely successful and useful residency.

John De Simone

With some trepidation, I set off to Cove Park on Friday 10th October. Not sure what to expect, wondering what could come of 6 composers in a room spending time together, rather than in our more usual solitary confinement. I was anxious about sharing my work and experiences, and unsure about what people would make of what I do and have to say. My trepidation was immediately dismissed when I got there and felt at ease and comfort in the beautiful surroundings.

What an amazing bunch of people that were there! From Fiona and Jo’s amazing organisation and cooking, to Sally Beamish’s inspiring and impressively honest reflections about being a professional composer- the participants were in a really great, safe space to enable an honest sharing of experiences, needs, and advice. I have been in a bit of a rut recently, wondering why I do what I do and the wonderful support I got this weekend from Sonja, Colin, Drew, Francis and Olly has me going back to Glasgow newly energised, committed, and enthusiastic about pushing forward with my career as a composer. I had a fantastic time. Thanks NMS!

Oliver Searle

Although I speak to composers a great deal, it is often in passing; over a quick coffee, in a concert interval, walking through a corridor, or through a mouthful of sandwich, with the occasional idea and thought thrown out fleetingly, as I rush headlong into the next activity.

There is very little time to get to the end of a conversation, reach a natural conclusion, or draw a tangible outcome or response from a group discussion, where everyone present has the chance to voice their opinions, concerns and ideas.

This residency facilitated these conversations, providing an opportunity to not only find the negatives in the current working lives of composers, but navigate a way through the quagmire of expectations, to reach positive goals, which we can hopefully take forward to begin making an affirmative change to new music in Scotland.

It was a fantastic chance to meet new composers and their work, but also to hear those I already knew talk more about their processes and activities, as well as hear their concerns (I particularly appreciated Sally’s honesty about her own career path).

The biggest positive outcome for me is the realisation that we can and should be positive about new music in Scotland. There is a diverse range of work being created, and it is all too easy to write much of this off as ‘not within my field’. My greatest hope is that we can support each other’s practice, act as advocates of each other’s work, and actively help each other in finding more/better opportunities to create new music, while crafting careers for the future.

hst-logoNew Music Scotland gratefully acknowledges the support of the Hope Scott Trust, who provided the funding to make this residency possible.

sound festival

October 6, 2014 in featured, Fiona Robertson, guest blog by Fiona Robertson

new sound logoIt’s the beginning of October already and this year’s sound festival is fast approaching.

We’re 10 years old…it’s very difficult to believe that in 2004 we did a small weekend taster to see if there might be an interest in North East Scotland for new music, and then launched the festival in 2005.

It’s strange looking back…so many things have changed, yet the structure of the festival was already there. 2005 was 20 days long (this year will be 19!) and we’d already created a network of local organisations around sound – –involved that year were Woodend Music Society, Aberdeen Jazz, Interesting Music Promotions, Monymusk Arts, Angus Arts, Strathdee Music Club and of course the University of Aberdeen and Woodend Barn. As well as concerts in Aberdeen, there were performances and workshops across Aberdeenshire.

That was the year we jointly commissioned Sally Beamish to write Trance O’Nicht for percussion and orchestra, performed by Evelyn Glennie and the BBC SSO. The Edinburgh Quartet performed new works by Naresh Sohal and Kenneth Dempster, the Hebrides Ensemble performed works by Haflidi Hallgrimsson, Marina Adamia and Olivier Messiaen. Other performers included Bill Thomspon, McKenzie Medboe, the Barbican Trio, the Glasgow String Quartet, Paul Anderson, Frog Pocket and La Boum…! But the most intensive and involving event was an afternoon’s rehearsal and informal performance by a scratch community orchestra of James MacMillan’s Into the Ferment, conducted by the composer, which remains one of my all-time favourite sound highlights. It involved local musicians from 11 to 88 years old, and even I got my viola out and took part (I can’t quite imagine doing that anymore!).

So what has changed since 2005?

The range and scale of the festival is very different. That year there were 27 events, this year there will be 47. In 2005, there were 2 world premieres, this year there will be 19.

sound has been growing up, little by little. It’s gone from being an enthusiastic youngster to a more mature (although still enthusiastic!) festival. It’s moved from being a local festival with a local network to a national festival with a strong network throughout Scotland and abroad. There has of course been a significant addition to that network since 2009. It’s difficult to imagine Scotland without Red Note, who are now our Associate Ensemble and one of our key partners. The local network has not been neglected and has grown over the years, crucial to what we want to achieve…and that is bringing in new audiences.

sound will always be a bit different from a number of other new music festivals. Maybe a little more gentle and less hard-edged. We still sometimes programme old alongside new, with the aim of introducing people gradually to contemporary music. Possibly a contested way of doing things, but it does seem to work for us. And we still have a variety of types of new music and events, aimed at attracting different types of audience.

 

And this year?

Strangely we don’t seem to have any of the same performers or composers at the festival this year as in 2005 (although many have returned multiple times). 2014 is an ambitious, more international festival with a cross-cutting theme of new approaches to traditional music (think harp or fiddles with electronics or works for bagpipes written by major international classical composers…).

The event I’m looking forward to most, though, epitomises where we’ve come to. It’s the result of partnership with Musiques Démesurées, a new music festival from Aberdeen’s twinned city Clermont-Ferrand. We’ve commissioned new works by French and Scottish composers to be performed by the combined forces of Red Note and the Orchestre d’Auvergne. It’s been a major, year-long project, and to see it come to fruition will be great. And the partnership with Musiques Démesurées will hopefully go on long beyond that – helped by sound’s French-speaking (and wine-loving!) team!

Meanwhile, we’ve got our heads down doing all the necessary nitty-gritty stuff – sourcing enormous amounts of percussion, fixing rehearsal times, booking accommodation, organising transport, printing more fliers. After months of planning and fundraising, everything is suddenly very real, very close and rather stressful. So please wait until late November to contact me about future festivals! Unless of course you’re planning a trip to the festival – it would be great to see more of our central belt colleagues making the trip North to hear some exciting new music. Aberdeen’s not that far away, honest!

Events

New Music Scotland Day 2014, Review

September 23, 2014 in featured, guest blog, News, Stuart MacRae by Stuart MacRae

NMS Day 2014A couple of weeks ago I attended the first NMS Day in Glasgow, hosted by the recently formed New Music Scotland. Run as a cooperative, New Music Scotland is unusual in including among its membership not only composers, but promoters, ensembles, performers, festivals and other professionals with an interest in new music.

This spirit of new music as a shared enterprise was apparent throughout the day, which began with a broad discussion of what the fledgling organisation had been set up to do – namely, to foster and encourage opportunity, networking and dissemination among Scotland’s new music practitioners and organisations – and how the board planned to put these aims into action over the coming years. All of which sounded to me like something that should have been done A Very Long Time Ago, so I stumped up 20 quid and became a member there and then.

A longish lunch break provided plenty of time for networking (I don’t like the word, but it’s essential nonetheless!). However the real substance of the day was in the afternoon panel sessions chaired by John Harris and Oliver Searle, which were billed as discussions of the opportunities available for the development of new music, both in Scotland and internationally.

Let’s deal with the massive elephant in the room – at least for the composers – first.

The recent Sound and Music commission fee survey, which revealed the average composer’s annual income from commission fees to be a paltry £3689 (for an average of 2-3 pieces), may have come as a bombshell to many outsiders, but to composers it was merely confirmation of what was already suspected: that the funding available for new commissions is hopelessly incommensurate with the number of new works being written, asked for, performed and commissioned. Not only that: nearly half of the survey’s respondents didn’t get paid for their work at all.

It seems clear that most composers would like to be busy and in demand, but also to be paid fairly for their work. And promoters, performers and festivals say they’d like to do more new music, but that it’s expensive to rehearse, to commission, to hire and to promote. Where there is a limit on available funding (and there always will be) something has to give; and it’s evident that composers bear the brunt of this mismatch, lowering fees and in many cases foregoing them entirely for the sake of having their work performed. Such devaluation of new music surely cannot be acceptable.

Susanna Eastburn, Chief Executive of Sound and Music, stressed in the first panel discussion that what is required is not an imposition of minimum fees, but a change in the value society places on new music: this, it seems, could come about if we find new ways to engage our audiences, to reach a global market through online dissemination and social media, to transform the live experience of music by taking it away from the traditional concert hall.

Clare Hewitt from Creative Scotland, who was also on the panel, echoed this in her emphasis on cross-artform work, citing the recent Commonwealth Cultural programme as an example of how artists and organisations could contribute to public events on a large scale.

But first composers need to decide what value they place on their own work.

Some commissioners of new work really don’t know how much they should be paying for a commission, and this makes it impossible for them to budget appropriately and take the necessary steps to secure funding in good time. I can’t think of a way to improve this that doesn’t involve a set of guidelines of some kind – or at the very least a collective effort between composers and commissioners to decide what is acceptable and reasonable.

The panel’s third contributor, James Hannam from the PRS for Music Foundation, told us he had seen a 300% rise in funding application activity over the last three years, and that there are also fewer festivals across all genres of music. This chimes with anecdotal evidence I’ve heard that as funding sources dry up or tighten their belts (for example private endowments, estates and trusts) there is increasing pressure on large funders such as PRSF and Creative Scotland as commissioners are bottlenecked into the same funding streams. On a more positive note, he pointed out that international interest in UK music is increasing, which suggests there is a wider international market for ensembles and composers out there if we can break into it.

It strikes me that all of the above leaves three options: the status quo, in which many commissions are not paid at a sustainable rate; far fewer, better paid commissions; or finding ways to make new music more economical, more attractive to alternative funders and promoters, and more ‘useful’ as composer John De Simone put it on the day.

The last option surely seems the most positive, and there was much advice to this end during the day, particularly with regard to the use of the Internet as a promotional and dissemination tool with truly global potential. The trick seems to be in learning how to use it effectively; and those who have done so are often now promoters in their own right, far more in control of their own work and opportunities (and income…?) than composers who are more dependent on the traditional system of commissions from established institutions.

(One caveat here: we don’t really know whether these empowered composer-curators who might just change the paradigm for new music are paying themselves either enough, or at all, and it would be interesting to know what goes first when there’s pressure on the budget.)

Next up was Graham McKenzie, Director of Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, who was not short of advice for ensembles and composers alike: make sure project proposals are as well targeted as possible; try to give a clear impression of the composer’s influences and approach; think internationally.

There were two headline figures from Mr. McKenzie’s talk:

  • 1%: the proportion of unsolicited project ideas that end up in the festival.
  • €2000: the amount he expects to contribute to a commission fee for a work to be premiered at the festival.

The first of these gives an indication of the enormity of the task facing big festival directors in choosing what to programme, and should encourage us all to work hard to make proposals as distinctive and necessary as possible.

The second figure, €2000 (yes, that’s Euros and not Pounds, which is revealing in itself) is meant to be just a part of a co-commission, the rest being made up of similar sums from as many as six international partners, which Mr. McKenzie says he works hard to persuade once he has decided to back a project. He didn’t say what size of piece this scenario would relate to (but it seems likely to be something quite substantial such as a full-length string quartet) but pointed out that a successful co-commission benefits everyone involved: more performances, international exposure, and lower costs.

And what if the international festivals don’t want to join in? Well, then the composer might end up with €2000, or no commission.

This all feels quite a long way from the empowered composer-curator mentioned earlier (in fact it seems like good old-fashioned patronage with a bit of modern venture capitalism thrown in) but perhaps that’s the price of finding a top-notch international platform.

Whatever conclusions can be drawn from the day, one thing is certain: the more we talk to each other about how to create and develop a healthy, thriving new music environment in Scotland, the more progress we will make, and the more confident we will grow.

 

New Music Scotland Day 2014

September 1, 2014 in featured by mwhiteside

NMS Day
Friday 5th September, 2014
RCS Opera Studio, Glasgow

We are delighted to announce the full details for the inaugural NMS Day on Friday 5th September.

This event, which coincides with the NMS AGM, is a chance for anyone with an interest in Scotland’s new music scene to come together and share opportunities, suggest ideas, discuss problems, and to meet with performers, composers, promoters and producers from across Scotland and beyond. It is free to attend. To reserve your place, simply email jo@newmusicscotland.co.uk.

We are delighted to welcome Graham McKenzie, Artistic Director and Chief Executive of Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, as our Guest Speaker for the event. Graham will be speaking at the opening session on new music in Scotland and the international market.

We will also be welcoming Susanna Eastburn, Chief Executive of Sound & Music, and Clare Hewitt, Development Officer at Creative Scotland, to join our afternoon discussion panel on opportunities and funding for new music in Scotland.

As well as giving everyone networking time, there will also be an update on recent NMS activity, including the new music mapping project. If you are interested in joining the NMS Board, please let us know, as there will be the opportuntity to do so at the AGM.

Schedule
10.30-11.00: Arrival, coffee and networking
11.00-11.15: Introductions
11.15-12.00: Discussion Session:
New music in Scotland and the international market with speaker: Graham McKenzie(Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival)
12.00-13.00: AGM
13.00-14.30: Lunch and networking
14.30-15.30: New Music Opportunities round-table discussion
Chair: John Harris
With Susanna Eastburn (Sound & Music)
Clare Hewitt (Creative Scotland)
15.30-16.00: Coffee Break
16.00-17.00: Report on NMS mapping activity, website and peer-to-peer composers course

For more information on how to get to the RCS, please visit their website here.

We very much look forward to seeing you there.

New Music Scotland Mapping Questionnaire

August 13, 2014 in featured by mwhiteside

New Music Scotland Mapping Questionnaire leading to the creation of a digital map of new music activity across Scotland, including information about promoters, venues, festivals and ensembles. This will become an invaluable resource for anyone wishing to tour, create, develop or produce new music in Scotland. .



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